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RTC TrailBlog

  • Making the Most of the Met (Metropolitan Branch Trail, That Is!)

    On June 25, Kathy Blaha, board member extraordinaire for both RTC and City Parks Alliance, posted this great blog on the programs helping to make the Metropolitan Branch Trail a true neighborhood gem. Programming is a valuable strategy for increasing trail use among individuals and families in local communities across the U.S., as RTC's trail development director, Kelly Pack, discusses in the blog.

    Thanks to the City Parks Alliance for letting RTC repost!  Happy reading!


    Urban Trails, Neighborhood Partnerships: D.C.’s Metropolitan Branch Trail

    Posted on June 25, 2014, by Kathy Blaha

    Abandoned rail lines running through city neighborhoods can be the perfect solution for creating a park in a high density city with little other available real estate. Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC) has nearly a 30-year history of providing leadership in the creation of more than 20,000 miles of new trail across the country. Today, it finds itself increasingly working in cities to forge the last connection to a regional trail system. This means tackling the shorter rail lines where their proximity to where people live, work and play makes them a good choice for getting people walking and cycling.

    But these urban trails require a lot more attention to get people to use them for recreation and transportation, and RTC finds itself increasingly involved in programming trails as well as building them.

    “RTC used to say, ‘build it and they will come,’” says Kelly Pack, RTC’s director of trail development. “Now we say, ‘build it, maintain it, program it, and they will come.’ In urban areas, people have a lot more choices. Being more engaged on the programming side really helps to build awareness and get people hooked on their own neighborhood trailsand then hopefully onto regional trail systems.”  

    Stretching 8.25 miles from Union Station in downtown Washington, D.C., to just across the border in Silver Spring, Md., the Metropolitan Branch Trail has long been a goal of neighborhood residents and planners in the region. RTC has been extremely active in organizing activities that encourage greater use of the Met Branch Trail.

    Read the full blog post on the City Parks Blog.

    Photo by Richard Anderson

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    Amy Kapp is RTC's content strategy manager and editor-in-chief of Rails to Trails magazine. Kapp frequently publishes articles and blog posts about topics related to parks and trails, the outdoors and community development.

  • You'll Be Seeing Bike Racks on Amtrak Very Soon!

    Some very exciting news for bicyclists!

    Check it: Amtrak recently announced that it is installing new baggage cars with bike racks to all its long-distance trains by the end of the year. This includes the Amtrak Capitol Limited train that runs between Washington, D.C., and Pittsburgh, Pa.—creating a new connection for cyclists between the Great Allegheny Passage (GAP) and the C & O Canal, and ultimately changing the way people tour, vacation and get around in the U.S. Awesome.

    Currently, only a small amount of Amtrak routes allow assembled bikes—and in limited amounts. But, as RTC covered in a blog last fall, Amtrak tested a brief pilot run of roll-on bike service with six vertically mounted bicycle restraints installed in a lower-level baggage area of a Superliner coach (departing from Pittsburgh). This breakthrough came after years of advocacy from local business people and bicyclists, who were frustrated by the lack of “roll-on” bike carriage service on Amtrak. Participants indicated that the tests were successful. 

    Amtrak had also been testing these bike racks in Michigan, New York and Vermont, but this was the first time they did so for a two-level Superliner.

    "After this test run of roll-on bike service, it's clear to me that carrying an unboxed bike on a train can work in the U.S., just as it does across Europe. My only concern is that on routes like the Capitol Limited, which serve bike-friendly cities and hugely popular corridors like the GAPCO and U.S. Bike Route 50, there won't be enough racks on each train to adequately meet demand,” said Champe Burnley of the Virginia Bicycling Federation, a long-time advocate for this issue.

    The new baggage cars to be installed this year—which are currently being tested in Chicago, New Orleans, Miami and the Northeast Corridor, according to an Amtrak blog post—will be used on all 15 of Amtrak’s long-distance routes, for the first time allowing the bicycling masses to transport their bikes without having to disassemble and pack them away during the train journey.  Nice—eh?

    For more information, check out this article by Jon Schmitz of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

    “It’s great to have Amtrak understanding how important the bike tourism industry is,” Linda Boxx is quoted as saying. A former president and current member of the Allegheny Trail Alliance, Boxx has worked for years to persuade Amtrak to provide better accommodations for bikes.

    And check out this post that recently ran in Streetsblog.

    RTC acknowledges the incredible efforts of Boxx and Burnley in making this historic development possible!  And a special shout out to Amtrak for recognizing how important it is to create connections for people who are embracing active transportation and trail tourism—things that are helping communities thrive along the GAP, the C & O and all across America.

    Top photo courtesy Orin Zebest via Flickr.

    Right photo (October bike rack pilot test run) courtesy of the Virginia Bicycling Federation.

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    Amy Kapp is RTC's content strategy manager and editor-in-chief of Rails to Trails magazine. Kapp frequently publishes articles and blog posts about topics related to parks and trails, the outdoors and community development.

     

  • Notice: Upcoming Railroad Abandonment in Marion County, Ind.

    RECEIVE RAILROAD ABANDONMENT NOTICES FOR YOUR STATE VIA E-MAIL 

    On or about June 16, 2014, CSX Transportation, Inc. filed for the abandonment of 1.49 miles of track within Indianapolis in Marion County, Ind. The corridor is located just south of the existing Central Canal Towpath. We are providing this information because it presents an opportunity to develop a real regional asset: a multi-use trail that can accommodate hikers, bikers, equestrians and other appropriate uses.

    NEXT STEPS: If this corridor is suitable for trail use, we strongly urge local trail advocates, or an appropriate local, regional or state agency or organization, to take action now. A “boiler plate” letter (found here) can be filed with the Surface Transportation Board (STB) and the abandoning railroad using STB docket number AB-55 (sub-no. 709x). Filing this letter does not commit its authors to acquire the corridor; it merely gives time to develop a rail-trail proposal and undertake negotiations with the railroad. According to the information we have received, the deadline for filing this letter is July 16, 2014. Even if this deadline is missed, there is probably still time to contact the relevant parties, since the railroad may have experienced a delay in filing all the paperwork, or the STB may still have jurisdiction over the corridor. However, it is important to take prompt action. The STB posts all abandonment decisions and filings on its website, including the complete filing for this corridor. More information on the rail corridor, including a map, can be found in this filing, or view a clearer map of the approximate route here.

    The STB has imposed a $250 filing fee for all railbanking requests. Entities filing a railbanking request may request a fee waiver or reduction, and government agencies will receive an automatic fee waiver. Throughout the process, make sure local government officials and citizen activists are kept informed of the project’s progress. We also recommend contacting your state trails coordinator or your state bicycle/pedestrian coordinator.

    Both of these individuals are knowledgeable about state laws and resources and may be able to assist your community with this rail-trail project. Also, you may want to contact the abandoning railroad to add your name to their service list.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AVAILABLE: RTC’s website may provide valuable tools as you plan for a rail-trail, including how-to manuals, the Trail-Building Toolbox, our Publications Library and the Trails & Greenways Listserv for trail advocates and professionals. These resources can be found within the “Trail-Building” section of our website. If you take advantage of this information and other resources promptly, you will be well on your way to creating a successful rail-trail in your community. For more information, or if you decide to pursue railbanking, please contact Eric Oberg at eric@railstotrails.org.

  • RTC's 2014 Sojourn Kicks Off!

    On Sunday, more than 250 trail enthusiasts from across the country convened in Maryland to start RTC's 12th annual Greenway Sojourn.

    This year's route began in Wierton, W.V., and will finish in Cumberland, Md., 191 miles, three states and four trail systems later. A new addition to the 2014 Sojourn is the walking option, and we're excited to have a strong group of walkers to launch the program!

    For many on this year's trip, the sojourn is not only an opportunity to ride on famous trails, like the Great Allegheny Passage, but also a chance to bring attention to gaps in the trail system in meaningful ways. On Monday, sojourners will give feedback to the town of Glassport, Pa., as they look into improving their town's bikeability.

    Tom Sexton, RTC's northeast regional director, reminded this year's participants of the impact that past sojourns have had in the trail world. "Every year, I have someone approach me, whether that's an elected official or a member of the chamber of commerce [from a local community along the route], and say 'Yeah, now I get it!' A light goes off, and it's a beautiful thing," he says.

    The kickoff day concluded with pulled pork sandwiches, local live music and ice cream! Needless to say, we're looking forward to the week ahead!

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    Katie Harris is a member of RTC's communications team. She is a frequent user and advocate of active transportation and recently completed a bike trip across the United States.

     

  • Get Out On the Trail in Celebration of Great Outdoors America Week!

    Hey Trail Lovers!

    June 23 to 26, 2014, is Great Outdoors America Week in Washington, D.C.!

    As one of the largest annual conservation and outdoor-focused events in the District, Great Outdoors America Week, or GO Week for short, brings together hundreds of diverse organizations and activists to meet with lawmakers and government reps. and advocate for an outdoor way of life. Throughout the week, many organizations also take the opportunity to hold events that raise awareness of, and celebrate, nature and the outdoors.

    In celebration of GO Week, Outdoor Alliance for Kids is hosting an OAK Youth Outdoors Event at the Bladensburg Waterfront Park on Wednesday, June 25. 

    Or, for those of you living in D.C., there are a number of trails that suit every age, ability and mood; whether you want to take a short walk or a long bike ride (or vice versa), there is a trail for you! Here's a list to get you started!

    Shorter outdoor excursions:

    Some a bit longer:

    And those for an all or multiple-day trail adventure:

    And of course, we at RTC encourage you, whether you live in Washington D.C. or not, to get outdoors and onto a trail!

    Photo courtesy Rudi Riet via Flickr

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    Elissa Southward is RTC's healthy communities manager. Southward recently earned a Ph.D. in Exercise and Health Sciences from the University of Bristol in England.

  • Fighting for TIGER: Thousands of Trail Supporters Speak Out

    On Monday, we asked trail users like you to support TIGER, a critical federal program that supports investments in trails, walking and biking. In just a few hours, thousands of you wrote to your representatives, and thanks to your swift action, support for TIGER has only grown.

    The Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery, or TIGER program, is a federal grant program. It gives communities the freedom and flexibility to invest in their unique transportation needs, whether that is a marine port upgrade, a new bus center or 10 miles of new paved trail. TIGER grants have provided approximately $153 million to pedestrian and bicycle projects alone, with hundreds of millions of dollars more awarded to projects that have walking or biking as a component. The grants can have a profound, positive impact on communities, helping families connect to jobs, giving children a safe way to get to school and strengthening local economies by moving products and goods.

    Every year, Congress decides how much general revenue will be dedicated to TIGER. This year, some members of the U.S. House of Representatives’ Appropriations Committee not only slashed funding for the program in their annual budget bill, but also restricted eligible projects to just three types: roads (including bridges and tunnels), ports and freight rail. This decision ignores the significance and importance of walking, biking and public transit in America, even going so far as to declare them “unessential.” It was a clear swipe at walking, biking and trail projects, which is why RTC, working with members of Congress, sprang into action. 

    In committee, Rep. Betty McCollum (Minn.-04) proposed an amendment to restore all the eligibilities to the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development budget bill. It garnered support but was ultimately defeated. When the bill reached the House floor, we asked RTC members to urge their representative to advocate for trails, walking, biking and the TIGER program. 

    As a result, 15 representatives spoke out passionately and loudly in support of restoring all eligibilities. Led by Reps. David Price (N.C.-04) and Mike Quigley (Ill.-05), the “TIGER line” of representatives stood up one after the other to “Strike the Last Word” and ask the House to restore all eligibilities and funding to TIGER. It was inspiring to see so many members of Congress ready, organized and passionately speaking out for trails, walking and bicycling. 

    Ultimately, the House passed the bill (H.R. 4745) with wording that strips walking, biking and transit eligibilities from TIGER, but the organized effort of those 15 representatives was still a win. Your voices as constituents, and the voices of your representatives who spoke out, showed that there are many who believe bicycle and pedestrian projects have a place in TIGER and in America’s transportation future. When the bill text is negotiated between the House and the Senate, it will put supporters of walking and biking in a favorable position to restore those eligibilities to TIGER. 

    It should also be noted that as a result of your actions, several representatives who were not able to join the “TIGER line” on Monday night reached out to RTC the next day and expressed an interest in supporting trails, walking and biking in future legislation. To everyone who wrote in: Thanks for your support! This is a perfect example of how contacting your elected officials can have an impact on policy decisions. In short, never doubt that your voice can make a difference. The fight for trails, walking and biking in TIGER isn’t over yet, and RTC will continue to follow this important issue. Stay tuned!

    Not on our e-mail list but want to get involved? Sign up for RTC Online and we’ll let you know of important trail developments in your area. 

    Photo courtesy of Radloff via Flickr.

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    Leeann Sinpatanasakul serves as advocacy coordinator for RTC's public policy team. She focuses on generating grassroots support in America for state and federal trail funding.

  • RTC Launches Development of Game-Changing Trail Planning Tool

    Earlier this month, RTC announced the launch of T-MAP (Trail Modeling and Assessment Platform), a three-year, $1.2-million initiative with the potential to set a new standard for trail planning in America. In partnership with researchers and trail managers in 12 U.S. cities, RTC will lead the first-ever nationwide survey of urban trail use and produce planning models and metrics that can forecast the returns on investment that trails stimulate around the country. 

    This project comes at a time when active transportation is on the rise in America, but requires a critical boost to move to the next level.

    There are more than 21,000 miles of rail-trails in the United States, and many of America’s 300 million citizens need cars to access them. In some communities, the lack of connectivity to basic  destinations such as places of employment, grocery stores and schools limits people’s livelihood and, to put it simply, their ability to thrive.

    That’s where T-MAP comes in.

    Decision-makers give considerable credence to quantitative methods for planning and prioritizing transportation investments. Such forecasting tools have been used in the highway planning process for decades, but have only recently begun to be developed for trail, bicycle and pedestrian investments. As a result, road projects are defined as needs, while trail projects are often considered amenities.

    Now, with T-MAP, trail planners will have instruments that communicate the most efficient and powerful ways to integrate our trails into networks that make the biggest impact and/or result in dollars saved on transportation, healthcare, tourism and economic development. 

    T-MAP will tell us what we’ve shared as a community through stories, but with a scientific angle that helps us make real arguments for connected trails and more walking and biking facilities.

    The T-MAP project includes three core models:

    • A GIS-based method for measuring trail-system connectivity: How well are the trails connecting us to the places we need to go? 
    • A trail-use demand factoring and forecasting model: How many people are using the trails, and how would this demand grow with the right additions or enhancements?
    • A set of impact assessment tools that translate trail use into dollars related to health and transportation impacts: What is the dollar value trail use provides in terms of healthcare savings and economic impact?

    By revealing how America is using trails, T-MAP will help developers prioritize projects that can maximize trail use and benefits. Trail-planning analysis will rise to the same level of sophistication as analysis for highways and major infrastructure. 

    When complete, we anticipate that T-MAP will be fundamental for connecting people, places and neighborhoods, spurring connections that turn walking and biking into mainstream modes of travel and transportation. 

    RTC is extremely excited to be a part of this game-changing project for trail planning, and we look forward to providing future updates over the next few years.

    In the meantime, to learn more about T-MAP, check out the project Web page at www.railstotrails.org/TMAP

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    Tracy Hadden Loh is RTC's research director as well as the lead researcher for the T-MAP project.

  • RTC’s Marianne Wesley Fowler Named 2014 Rail-Trail Champion

     

    RTC is excited to announce Marianne Wesley Fowler of Alexandria, Va., as this year’s Doppelt Family Rail-Trail Champion—a designation honoring Fowler’s incredible contributions to RTC and the rail-trail movement over the past two-and-a-half decades. 

    Established through the generous support of the Doppelt family, this award program was designed to honor individuals who have made significant contributions to the rail-trail movement through their work, volunteerism or support—in short, people who have gone above and beyond in the name of trails.

    Since joining the RTC team in 1988, Fowler has played an incredible role in the development and support of rail-trails across the country. As southern organizer in the late 1980s and early 1990s, she helped bring about the region’s first rail-trail networks, including the creation of the now-legendary Silver Comet/Chief Ladiga Trail and the early identification of the Atlanta BeltLine as a potential rail-with-trail in her 1991 "Abandoned Rail Corridor Assessment Report" of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area.

    Later, as a leader of RTC’s policy advocacy team, she was pivotal in helping to protect hundreds of millions of dollars in federal funds for trails, and walking and biking infrastructure—having played an active part in the reauthorization of four federal transportation acts, including ISTEA, TEA-21, SAFETEA-LU and MAP-21—and was also key in the establishment of the Recreational Trails Program and the Safe Routes to School Program.

    She has also been critical to protecting the federal railbanking statute, and served as a lead national organizer for the Nonmotorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP)—in which infrastructural improvements in four U.S. cities have thus far resulted in 85 million miles of active transportation as opposed to driving. 

    With her designation as a Rail-Trail Champion, she joins the ranks of a select group of men and women who’ve made remarkable contributions to rail-trails, including the late Fred Meijer, founder of the Fred Meijer Trails Network, the U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, the late Minnesota Congressman James Oberstar, and Joshua David and Robert Hammond, founders of New York’s High Line.

    “Marianne has been a pinnacle player in the rail-trail movement, and her advocacy has helped establish walking and biking networks around the country,” said Keith Laughlin, president of RTC. “We’re pleased to honor a person who’s been a true game-changer to active transportation in America.”

    In the 2014 Green Issue of Rails to Trails magazine, launching on June 11, Fowler—RTC’s resident storyteller—will talk about the early days of the rail-trail movement, defending federal funds in Congress, and the creation and success of NTPP. As she talks about these moments in rail-trail history, her passion—never wavering in 25 years—is evident. 

    Later this year, RTC will honor her in a special event to commemorate her achievements.  Stay tuned!

     

    Left photos: Marianne Wesley Fowler; right photo: Marianne with Rep. James Oberstar (1934 - 2014) and Rep. Tom Petri in 2012. 

  • Bike Advocacy: Why Teton County Commissioner Melissa Turley Is Truly Inspired

     

    The trail world is filled with inspiring people. Some are folks that use and celebrate the pathways in their community on a daily basis. Others are champions, enacting change and making decisions that help the trails movement. And some, like Teton County, Wyo.’s Commissioner Melissa Turley, are both.

    In her role as county commissioner, a position that she has held for a little more than a year, she has developed and adopted the first-ever strategic plan for the Board of County Commissioners focused on a shared vision to ensure a healthy community, environment and economy for Teton County. Turley was also a strong supporter of the construction of two vital sections of pathways in Jackson Hole, which connect communities within the valley and strengthen the existing trail system. She has a lot on her plate, but she makes active transportation a priority and frequently integrates it into her mission as an elected official.

    I caught up with Turley to learn more about her involvement with the trails in Teton County and to find out what her most memorable experiences on bikes and trails have been so far.

    Here’s what she had to say:

    1. Her first overnight ride with her mom

    “Both of my parents were avid cyclists,” affirms Turley. Her mom took her on her first overnight trip as a 12-year-old girl, a one-night tour that Turley says was incredibly empowering. But it wasn’t just touring that Turley’s parents brought to her. “[Growing up], bikes were a way of life, whether for transportation, riding to Sunday brunch, racing or long-distance rides,” states Turley. Cycling as a lifestyle has stuck with her to this day. 

    2. Riding the trail to Grand Teton National Park

    Jackson, Wyo., is a gateway town to both Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks. Thanks to the hard work of many agencies, organizations and individuals, there is a paved bike path that begins in the town of Jackson and runs 15 miles north into the Grand Tetons, flanked on one side by the National Elk Refuge and on the other by the majestic peaks of the Teton Range. 

    Turley says she loves riding that section of trail because of all her fellow riders, adding that it provides a transportation and recreation outlet for locals while shining a spotlight on the community. 

    3. Commuting to teach her spin class 

    Not limiting herself to biking outside, Turley has been spinning indoors for more than 10 years. She joined the ranks as an instructor in 2012. Weather permitting, Turley rides her bike to teach her spin classes. And an extra bonus: “It’s a great warm-up and cool-down!” 

    4. Seeing community support for bike trails

    The outpouring of support for community pathways is inspiring to Turley, and this goes beyond just trail use. “Any time a ballot initiative comes up that would help fund bike or pedestrian projects, it is passed by the voters by an overwhelming majority,” Turley reports. To complement the point, she mentions an inspiring mode shift that took place last summer when major construction took place at one of the central intersections in town. Instead of driving, many people hopped on their bikes to avoid the extra traffic around the site.

    “I had people approaching me and telling me that they were surprised at how much they enjoyed commuting by bike; it didn’t take that much longer to arrive and it was surprisingly fun and low stress!”

    Turley touts the benefits that trails bring to the environmental, health and economic sectors of a community. “By supporting pathways and other bike infrastructure, we make it easier for those who do choose to drive. We all win when we get people out of their cars,” she says.

    5. Riding with her son George

    Instead of being stuck in a hot car, the mother-and-son duo are riding together.

    “I commute with [my son] as much as I can,” says Turley. “It is a fun way to get around! We can talk, play and laugh; we interact with each other and our community.” 

    Turley wants to instill the same values in George that her parents instilled in her—that cycling is not just for recreation or exercise, it can also be transportation and a release. 

    “On my bike is where I find my peace,” states Turley. “I want to be teaching that to George. I want him to find that peace as well.”

     

    Top and right photos courtesy of Melissa Turley; left photo courtesy of Friends of Pathways.

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    Katie Harris is a member of RTC's policy team. She is a frequent user and advocate of active transportation and recently completed a bike trip across the United States.

  • Senate’s Turn Part I: Senate Committee Takes On the Transportation Reauthorization Bill

    Last week, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee passed a bill (S. 2322) to reauthorize MAP-21, the federal transportation legislation passed in 2012, which will expire at the end of September. The new bill seeks to fund transportation projects at status quo levels plus inflation through fiscal year 2020. The underlying premise of the bill is that transportation policies should not change substantially but should only be marginally refined, that long-term funding is critical for large infrastructure projects and that the current funding levels are acceptable.  

    Three other Senate committees need to mark up the bill before the full Senate will act. A key to that process will be to identify a bipartisan solution to expected funding shortfalls.

    While there are not far-reaching policy changes in the bill, several refinements would affect trail, walking and bicycling programs. Specifically, the bill—

    1.  Amends the Transportation Alternatives Program, the core federal source for dollars to build trail systems. This includes the following:

    • A greater portion of Transportation Alternatives projects (two-thirds rather than half) would be distributed by population and would be allocated by regional planning agencies rather than state departments of transportation.
    • Nonprofit organizations with responsibility for local transportation safety programs, such as Safe Routes to School, would be eligible to receive funds.
    • States would assume responsibility to report annually on their spending. Note, however, that RTC has collected information very similar to this from states for the Transportation Alternatives Program and previously did so for Transportation Enhancements. All of this information will be available on the Transportation Alternatives Data Exchange on the RTC website.

    2.  Provides significant funding for two programs that could be used for active transportation projects: 1) The Projects of National or Regional Significance program, which would help fund large projects that could include pedestrian or bicycle elements; and 2) American Transportation Awards, which could provide up to $10 million in funding for states or Metropolitan Planning Organizations to promote the use of best practices, including integration into larger projects and connecting trails to promote cycling and walking.

    3.  Continues the TIGER program, which has funded a number of pedestrian and bike networks.

    4.  Amends the Highway Safety Improvement Program performance measures to explicitly include non-motorized transportation serious injuries and fatalities. As Sen. Jeff Merkley noted at the mark-up, pedestrian and bicycle fatalities have risen, so it is important to focus on solutions.

    5.  Continues the Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) program, a successful low-interest loan program that has been used to provide leverage for transportation projects over $50 million. Smaller projects have not benefited because of the floor on project size and the cost of applying. The bill would lower the threshold to $10 million for projects located within walking distance from certain transit facilities. These projects could include active transportation elements. The TIFIA program would also provide $2 million per year to cover administrative fees for projects smaller than $75 million.

    The Committee remains open to addressing specific unresolved issues for which bipartisan consensus can be achieved. The bill has yet to be considered by the Senate Finance Committee, the Senate Banking Committee and the Senate Commerce Committee. Stay tuned!

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    Kevin Mills is RTC’s Senior Vice President of Policy and Trail Development, and instigator of the Partnership for Active Transportation.

  • Notice: Upcoming Railroad Abandonment in Kiowa County, Colo.

    RECEIVE RAILROAD ABANDONMENT NOTICES FOR YOUR STATE VIA E-MAIL 

    On or about May 14, 2014, V & S Railway filed for the abandonment of 38 miles of track between Towner and Eads in Kiowa County, Colo. We are providing this information because it presents an opportunity to develop a real regional asset: a multi-use trail that can accommodate hikers, bikers, equestrians and other appropriate uses.

    NEXT STEPS: If this corridor is suitable for trail use, we strongly urge local trail advocates, or an appropriate local, regional or state agency or organization, to take action now. A “boiler plate” letter (found here) can be filed with the Surface Transportation Board (STB) and the abandoning railroad using STB docket number AB-603 (sub-no. 3x). Filing this letter does not commit its authors to acquire the corridor; it merely gives time to develop a rail-trail proposal and undertake negotiations with the railroad. According to the information we have received, the deadline for filing this letter is June 13, 2014. Even if this deadline is missed, there is probably still time to contact the relevant parties, since the railroad may have experienced a delay in filing all of the paperwork, or the STB may still have jurisdiction over the corridor. However, it is important to take prompt action. The STB posts all abandonment decisions and filings on its website, including the complete filing for this corridor. More information on the rail corridor, including a map, can be found in this filing, or view a clearer map of the approximate route here.

    The STB has imposed a $250 filing fee for all railbanking requests. Entities filing a railbanking request may request a fee waiver or reduction, and government agencies will receive an automatic fee waiver. Throughout the process, make sure local government officials and citizen activists are kept informed of the project’s progress. We also recommend contacting your state trails coordinator or your state bicycle/pedestrian coordinator.

    Both of these individuals are knowledgeable about state laws and resources and may be able to assist your community with this rail-trail project. Also, you may want to contact the abandoning railroad to add your name to their service list.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AVAILABLE: RTC’s website may provide valuable tools as you plan for a rail-trail, including how-to manuals, the Trail-Building Toolbox, our Publications Library and the Trails & Greenways Listserv for trail advocates and professionals. These resources can be found within the “Trail-Building” section of our website. If you take advantage of this information and other resources promptly, you will be well on your way to creating a successful rail-trail in your community. For more information, or if you decide to pursue railbanking, please contact Eli Griffen at eli@railstotrails.org.

  • First Georgia Trail Summit in 15 Years Strong on Vision and Can-Do

    In mid-April in Athens, Ga., 150 people took part in the first Georgia Trail Summit in 15 years.  

    The tone was moderate and corporate friendly—yet no less visionary.

    Jo Claire Hickson of the Savannah-based Coastal Georgia Greenway called for an inventory of trails as well as for protecting corridors and anticipating connections. She proposed a one-year, government-university trails study that “the governor we elect in 2014 can consider for policy adoption.” 

    Jim Langford of MillionMile Greenway (MMG), the organization that coordinated the summit, noted a great commonality among communities and their needs and plans, and great enthusiasm for new trail ideas. He also noted a desire among attendees for more meetings of this kind and the desire “to do this in a nonprofit way instead of government.” 

    But of course, there were more questions than answers.

    “We don’t have answers yet to where public funding will come from, through which agencies and [for what purposes it will be applied],” said Langford. “The time is right to get legislators together. They need to hear some successes…and that the movement is broad based and not led by a single organization.”

    It was two Atlanta-based organizations—the PATH Foundation and the Atlanta BeltLine—that showed the way for getting trails built. Both championed private-public partners and privately driven nonprofit leadership.

    PATH Foundation is a trail-building dynamo that, in the last 23 years, has put up some 200 miles of trail, including the widely used 61.5-mile Silver Comet Trail. PATH’s ambition is to make Atlanta the best trail-connected city in America, with its work centering on a 20-year vision newly advanced by $14.33 million raised to build 37 more miles of trail. 

    The 33-mile Atlanta BeltLine—when complete—will connect 45 in-town neighborhoods, public parks and commuter rail. It will run directly through the third level of the million-square-foot multi-purpose Ponce City Market that developers emphasize will have bike valet, changing facilities and showers to encourage alternative commuting options. 

    Ryan Gravel was responsible for initiating the BeltLine idea as a Georgia Tech graduate. “People along the route have discovered a vision better than anybody else was showing them,” said Gravel. “They’re filling it out with affordable and public housing, art, farmers’ markets, local food, pollinators and bocce ball courts. People are really organizing their lives around this new corridor. It lets them live the lives they want.”

    He added, “We’re not only dramatically changing the physical form of the city and how people connect, but we’re changing our cultural expectations. This is huge for a city generally considered the poster child for sprawl. Looking ahead, it’s a different world.”

    A summary report of the summit has called for annual meetings, a statewide strategic trails plan and educating legislators. For the complete report and for additional Georgia trail resources, go to http://georgiatrailsummit.com/resources

    Top photo: Attendees of the Georgia Trail Summit at a workshop at Murmur Railroad Trestle in Athens, Ga. Photo courtesy of Georgia Trail Summit.

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    Herb Hiller works for the East Coast Greenway Alliance and frequently writes about trails and active transportation in Georgia.

  • Bike to Work Day - The Power of Just Being There

    What does riding a bike mean to you?

    Is it your only mode of transportation and vital for you to get from A to B? Or do you just like to go for a spin on the weekend with friends?

    If you're anything like me, it's somewhere in the middle. Riding a bike doesn't define you. But it's something great in your life that makes it easier to get around, to stay fit and active, and to be free from the hassles of being dependent on a car and dealing with traffic.

    There's a lot of joy in riding a bike! And that's why Bike to Work Day has grown into the wonderful, nationwide party that it is today.

    For one day in May, in communities across America, rookies and seasoned veterans alike gather along popular bike routes to celebrate their pedal-powered commute and learn more about the advocacy groups working hard to make riding safer and more convenient.

    But it's important to remember that Bike to Work Day is also about demonstrating to lawmakers and transportation officials that, yes, riding a bike is a transportation choice for millions of Americans, and this mode needs to be supported in our transportation policies.

    So, just by showing up and taking part, you are adding one more body to the booming crowd and demonstrating to the powers-that-be just how many Americans regularly ride a bike.

    Who knew advocacy could be so simple? You might even enjoy yourself...

    Bike to Work Day is often held on a different day in May, dependent on the organizers in your community. So get in touch with your local bike advocacy groups, if you know them, or google "Bike to Work Day" and the name of your community to see what's happening locally. Pedal on.

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    Jake Lynch is RTC’s marketing and media relations specialist. Born and raised in the wilds of rural Australia, Jake now helps tell the story of America’s rail-trails, from big cities to one-horse towns and everywhere in between. 

  • The Profitable Tail of the Silver Comet Trail

    I recently pedaled the Silver Comet Trail from Smyrna, Ga., a suburb north of Atlanta, to Cedartown, a small city with an historic downtown near the Alabama border. My ride through the mostly wooded countryside was so pleasant, I didn’t want it to end. 

    Apparently, I’m not alone. 

    A 2013 study by the Northwest Georgia Regional Planning Commission recommends more than doubling the length of the Silver Comet Trail at its “tail” endwith spurs to nearby commercial centers and longer extensions to Marietta, Rome and Atlanta’s growing bike-path network. 

    As illustrated in their 2013 “Silver Comet Trail Economic Impact Assessment and Planning Study,” trails are well-established economic engines. 

    The study finds that every dollar invested in trails creates at least three dollars of return from tourism and recreation-related activities like equipment rentals, restaurants and lodging. 

    As an added note: Some studies have documented much higher rates of return, such as 900 percent in North Carolina’s Outer Banks and 1,180 percent in Kansas City!

    In its present 61-mile makeup, 1.9 million users flock to the Silver Comet Trail each year, which got its name from the train that once sped passengers between New York City and Birmingham, Ala. Survey results conclude that Silver Comet Trail users generate $57 million in direct spending annually on food, clothing, lodging and other trip-related items. 

    One of the beneficiaries: Frankie’s Italian Restaurant in Rockmart, where cyclists can memorialize their rides by writing on a wall of fame!

    The $57 million of direct spending estimated by the study creates an additional $61 million in indirect impact as dollars ripple through the economy. The total spending of almost $120 million in Georgia supports roughly 1,300 jobs and $37 million in earnings. In addition, the combined direct and indirect spending generates roughly $3.5 million in income tax, sales tax and business tax revenues.

    Many trail users live in communities that are not adjacent to the trail; the study documents trail users from 23 counties in 8 different states—some as far away as Washington. 

    Ramona Ruark, Cedartown Main Street director, adds that the visitor log in the Cedartown Welcome Center—a replica of the city's original train station—documents trail users from other countries as well. 

    More than one-fifth of the people who responded to a 2013 survey stay overnight when visiting the trail—not surprising since roughly 15-million people live outside Georgia but within a 150-mile radius of the Silver Comet Trail. In fact, the study found that these bicycle tourists spend roughly $20 million annually on their visits.

    Jackie Crum, owner of the Ragsdale Inn just off the trail in Dallas, estimates that more than half of her guests are Silver Comet Trail riders. “Tourism is wonderful for the local economy,” she explains. “It generates income without the infrastructure needs and tax burdens of residential development.” 

    Now, let’s talk about property values…

    Several organizations have calculated the residential property value increases associated with proximity to trails and green space. A fact sheet from Rails-to-Trails Conservancy reports that properties along a trail in Brown County, Wis., fetched a 9 percent premium, and a regional greenway in Apex, N.C., added $5,000 to the sales price of adjacent homes in the Shepherd’s Vineyard development. 

    The Silver Comet Trail study summarizes that trails are responsible for a 4 to 7 percent increase in property value for homes within one-quarter mile. The study also estimates that the trail is capable of attracting developers to build new houses on vacant land near the trail with a value of up to $41 million, generating an additional half-million dollars in property tax revenue. 

    Trail-adjacent business owners are excited about the proposal to double the length of the trail. Longer trails mean more riders, more business, more jobs, more tax revenues and, consequently, more prosperity. 

    Photos by Rick Pruetz.  Top: Silver Comet Trail wildlife area; top right: Historic Downtown Dallas, Ga.; middle left: Frankie's Italian Restaurant in Rockmart, Ga.; bottom right: Jackie Crum in front of the Ragsdale Inn in Dallas, Ga.

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    Rick Pruetz is a planning consultant specializing in open space preservation. He is also an avid cyclist and occasionally writes about the economic benefits of rail trails. 

  • Obama Bill Offers Way Forward on Active Transportation

    This week, the White House and U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx put forward the GROW AMERICA Act, a bill which would increase funding for transportation infrastructure in the United States. GROW AMERICA includes provisions that could support the development of active transportation networks; that is, infrastructure for human-powered modes of transportation such as walking and biking. 

    The Act promotes the use of transportation infrastructure as “Ladders of Opportunity” to ensure that every individual in our country has an opportunity to work and to succeed. Key parts of that vision include enhancing active transportation networks by building more trails, sidewalks and bike lanes and increasing pedestrian and bicycle safety. 

    Some highlights of the Act are as follows:   

    1. The Act designates some metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs)—the local authorities for coordinating transportation planning in metropolitan areas—as ‘high-performance’ and allocates to them an additional 50 percent of Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funds; TAP is the main federal program that enables trails and other walking and bicycling facilities to be built. This would empower metropolitan areas that are most able to lead with capacity to accelerate development of active transportation networks. 
    2. The Act focuses on connectivity between active transportation, public transportation and roads, with particular attention to disadvantaged areas. It establishes funding for a pilot program that would allow up to 10 metropolitan areas to inventory gaps in connectivity and implement projects that address them. It also establishes a National Connectivity Performance Measure focused on increasing connectivity for low-income communities and people with limited transportation options, creating ladders of opportunities for these individuals.
    3. The Act makes the Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act of 1998 (TIFIA), which leverages private financing of transportation projects, more accessible for smaller projects. Specifically, it enables the U.S. Department of Transportation to pay fees associated with establishing these projects. However, the provision would be more effective in aiding active transportation networks if it also reduced the size of projects that are eligible.
    4. The Act promotes the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists by requiring states to implement activities designed to decrease deaths and injuries resulting from accidents. Additionally, if excess highway safety funds are transferred for the purpose of providing additional grants to the states, the act requires that at least 30 percent of those transferred funds must be used for the purpose of pedestrian and bicycle safety if pedestrian and bicycle fatalities are more than 5 percent of the state’s total.
    5. The Act establishes a new Transportation Trust Fund to replace the existing Highway Trust Fund, recognizing the fact that the new Trust Fund would support a complete transportation system that includes public transit and active transportation—not just highways.

    The Act also retains funding for the Transportation Alternative Program (TAP), which includes the Recreational Trails Program, a vital funding source for recreational trails and related facilities around the country.  

    RTC will work to support and improve provisions that will enhance trails and active transportation networks, and make it safer to walk and bike. We must ensure that the federal government provides increased support for years to come, and implements these program in a way that will make the most of the resources and opportunities available. 

    Photo courtesy of Adam Fagen via Flickr

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    Patrick Wojahn recently joined RTC as the director of government relations. He focuses on national, state and local policy efforts to build broad support for trails across America.

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Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
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